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Posts Tagged ‘biologicals’

Given the fact that there are a slew of RA medications laying on the failure heap, I’m willing to move outside the box and so is my doctor. The latest drug to be tried will be secukinumab – brand name Cosentyx by Norvartis. This biologic is currently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the autoimmune diseases psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis (PSA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Cosentyx is an interleukin 17 (IL-17) inhibitor. IL-17 is a cytokine produced by T cell lymphocytes and is connected with autoimmune inflammatory responses. I reported on clinical trials with secukinumab for RA back in 2012. In a recently reported clinical trial being conducted for RA, patients demonstrated improvement over a one year treatment period. Safety and side effect profiles match other biologics with increased risk of infections, allergic reactions, changes in liver and blood tests, and cases of inflammatory bowel disease.

My official diagnosis has been seropositive rheumatoid arthritis due to positive rheumatoid factor (RF) tests, classic RA symptoms like symmetrical bilateral presentation, and bone erosions. But I’ve also shown symptoms more associated with AS like tendon insertion tearing, large joint involvement, and uveitis but without a positive genetic marker for AS (HLA-B27). In addition, my grandmother dealt with psoriasis and her brother had a debilitating case of ankylosing spondylitis. My insurance approved this drug for my use and I will begin the weekly loading dose self-injections as soon as they are shipped. We’ll see how I respond to this newest option.

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As noted in another post, I seem to have a refractory case of rheumatoid arthritis and have even been labeled as such by my rheumatologist. I’ve been on 16 different RA medications (see list bel0w) since being diagnosed in early 2009 (see https://rheumatoidarthritis.net/living/already-shot/). Some of these medications were taken in combination with one another. For example, methotrexate and Humira. All of these medications failed for a variety of reasons.

The latest drug on the heap of failed drugs is Kineret. I started injections starting Feb 7 after finally getting over a thrush infection which required two different anti-fungals to control. Within a day I started getting migraines and nausea. The migraines were present every day and increased in intensity to the point where I ended up taking migraine abortive medicines multiple times to knock them down. This happened after only having two significant migraine episodes the entire month of January. The nausea was primarily in the lower abdomen, got bad the second day, and increased to the point where it was waking me up in the middle of the night. I was not able to function well during the day. One evening I experienced sharp pains in the lower abdomen and also had some diarrhea periodically . Upon waking one morning, I just couldn’t stomach (pun intended) the thought of injecting Kineret and dealing with the migraines and nausea anymore. I contacted my rheumatologist and asked what to do. She stated, “I agree with stopping Kineret – thanks for trying. Let me chat with my partners to see what they think. There are several new drugs out for psoriatic arthritis that may have early data for RA too.

It’s hard to fathom untreated RA as the impact can be debilitating and disabling so treatment is needed. As my rheumatologist mentioned at the last appointment and in the recent message, it may be time to try something experimental and off label which would require insurance approval. Perhaps it’s time to investigate clinical trials as there are a host of drugs being tested for RA.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug  Duration  Reason for Stoping
Sulphasalazine oral

1 week

Allergic reaction – hives

Methotrexate oral and self-injection

2 years

Triggered migraines

Enbrel self-injection

5 months

Lack of efficacy

Meloxicam (Mobic) oral

3 weeks

Gastritis

Salsalate oral

3 weeks

Gastritis

Cimzia self-injection

5 months

Lack of efficacy

Humira self-injection

1.5 years

Reduced efficacy over time

Orencia infusion

1 year

Reduced efficacy over time

Imuran (azathioprine) oral

5 months

Gastric pain, nausea

Leflunomide (Arava) oral

5 months

Gastric pain, nausea, diarrhea

Actemra (tocilizumab) infusion

5 months

Raised cholesterol and triglycerides

Remicade (Infliximab) infusion

6 months

Triggered migraines

CellCept oral

6 months

Gastric pain, nausea

Rituxan (Rituxamab) infusion

2.5 years

Reduced efficacy over time, recurrent and serious infections

Xeljanz oral

3 months

Triggered migraines, gastric pain

Kineret (Anakinra) self- injection

1 week

Triggered migraines, nausea, diarrhea

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It appears that my 2.5 year journey with Rituxan is coming to an end. A scheduled infusion was cancelled at the last minute by my rheumatologist due to side effects from the last infusion and lack of efficacy. For anyone who knows my journey with RA, it’s no secret that I’ve been through a gamut of treatment options. The list of previous treatments reads like a who’s who of pharmaceuticals for autoimmune diseases. I’ve tried the following in chronological order:

  • sulphasalazine (oral)
  • methotrexate (oral)
  • Enbrel (self-injection)
  • Meloxicam (oral)
  • Salsalate (oral)
  • Cimzia (self-injection)
  • Humira (self-injection)
  • Orencia (infusion)
  • Imuran (oral)
  • Leflunomide (oral)
  • Actemra (infusion)
  • methotrexate (self-injection)
  • Remicade (infusion)
  • CellCept (oral)
  • Rituxan (infusion)

That’s two NSAIDs, five DMARDs, and seven biologics. The reasons for stopping these treatments varied from experiencing side effects to lack of efficacy. Side effects included serious infections, low lymphocyte counts and infusion reaction – persistent migraine, nausea, flu-like aches and pains. I’m very hesitant to switch treatments as the options are getting rather slim. I’ve probably resisted dropping Rituxan longer than I should’ve for this reason.

The latest treatment being recommended by my rheumatologist is the newer drug Xeljanz which is called an “oral biologic”. My rheumatologist and I talked about this drug several years ago when it was first approved in the United States. But she wanted to wait until there was more information and experiences. It was not approved by a European drug agency for safety and efficacy reasons. Xeljanz works by inhibiting a molecule called kinase. Kinases are molecules linked to a cellular pathway, called the Jak-STAT pathway, that produce inflammation-causing cytokine proteins. In RA, it’s these cytokines that ultimately cause the tissue destroying symptoms. Potential side effects are pretty typical of immune suppressing medicines, such as increased risk of infections, but also include perforations in the stomach and intestines. I’m waiting for insurance approval and shipment from a speciality pharmacy. In the meantime, I’ll sign up for the co-pay assistance plan from Pfizer.

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On March 6, 2015 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first biosimilar drug for use by patients in the United States (see FDA press release). The drug called Zarxio (filgrastim-sndz) is produced by Sandoz and is similar to Amgen’s Neupogen (filgrastim). Both are approved to treat certain kinds of cancers and bone marrow transplants.

Biologic medicines come from living organisms. They are different from chemical medicines in that they contain large and delicate biological molecules such as proteins, must be injected or infused since stomach acids would damage the molecules, and are usually much more expensive than chemical medicines due to development and complicated production costs. Given the high development costs associated with biologics, they are given an extended patent length of 12 years in the United States. When a chemical drug looses its patent protection, companies produce generics that are exact chemical matches. Generics are widely used and are much cheaper than the original drug. Given the complexity of biologics, exact chemical matches are replaced with scientific equivalency meaning that the biologic is similar in action but not exactly the same – thus the name “biosimilar” being used for these drugs (Entine, 2012).1

Some of the most popular RA biologic medicines stand to loose patent protection in the United States in next few years.

Read the rest of the article at http://rheumatoidarthritis.net/news/fda-approves-first-biosimilar-drug-whats-next-for-ra/.

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Since being diagnosed with RA in 2009, it’s been an interesting process trying to find the right treatment combination. To date, seven biologics and four disease-modifying (DMARDs) medicines in various combinations and dosages have been tried. The DMARDS used in the past include the following:

Sulfasalazine – This was the first DMARD tried after diagnosis. An allergic reaction resulted in severe hives and cessation of this drug.
Methotrexate – Oral pills were used. Unrelenting and unbearable gastrointestinal issues precipitated an end to this trial.
Leflunomide (Arava) – This DMARD did not have much impact on RA symptoms.
Azathioprine (Imuran) – This DMARD did not have much impact on RA symptoms.
Methotrexate – Self-injections were used for the second trial of MTX. Injections were stopped about a year later due to evidence that they were contributing to migraines.

Rituxan (Rituximab) is the latest biologic and I’ve been on it for 1½ years. The typical suggested treatment plan is two infusions every six months but I’ve been on a schedule of two doses every four months. The last infusions were in October and November but it seems that its impact is not just not optimum. Joint pain, swelling, and fatigue are all on the increase and neck surgery six months ago coupled with an elbow surgery in the near future lend evidence that Rituxan alone is not keeping the disease in check. After a discussion with my rheumatologist this week, it was decided that adding another DMARD might help control the disease processes. There aren’t many choices left and my rheumatologist suggested trying Mycophenolate, or CellCept, in combination with the Rituxan infusions.

CellCept was originally developed to help organ transplant patients from rejecting their new organs. It works by suppressing the immune system. Now it’s commonly used to treat lupus but is also used for other autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis. As with many DMARDs, common side effects involve the gastrointestinal system. Blood counts can be impacted so regular blood tests are conducted. [1] There aren’t many published studies on CellCept although it’s been proposed as an alternate DMARD for those with refractory disease not responding to other treatments. [2]

A new treatment experiment begins. Hopefully it will bring some much needed relief.

[1] http://www.rheumatology.org/Practice/Clinical/Patients/Medications/Mycophenolate_Mofetil_(CellCept)_and_Mycophenolate_Sodium_(Myfortic)/

[2] http://www.smw.ch/docs/pdfcontent/smw-12441.pdf

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I’ve been on seven – count them – seven different biologic medicines since being diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. I started with several anti-TNF biologics and then moved to several others even bouncing back to try another anti-TNF before eventually trying Rituxan. I’ve self-injected with auto-inject pens, self-injected with needles, and seems like I’ve had every type of infusion possible. This is probably something of a record although similar stories emerge on discussion boards from time to time. With some of the biologics, I would respond for a period of time and then it would stop working. With others, there was never a response. With yet others, there would be some adverse side-effect causing cessation. This is not all to unusual as it is widely know in the rheumatology community that upwards of 30% of RA patients do not positively respond to anti-TNF biologic medicines.

Read the rest at … http://rheumatoidarthritis.net/living/switching-ra-medicines-dont-wait-long-try-many/

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I’m the only male Patient Advocate and Moderator on www.rheumatoidarthritis.net and the corresponding Facebook page. There is a great page on RA and Women’s Health on our website but no corresponding page for men. Of all the people who visit the Facebook page, only 15% of the people reached were men and only 9% of the people who actively engaged by liking, sharing, or commenting on posts were men. All of this is not too surprising given the fact that the ratio of women to men with RA is about 2 to 1.[1] But with approximately 1.5 million people in the United States with RA[2], that would mean that almost half a million men suffer from RA.

When it comes to autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, lupus, scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjogren’s syndrome, women seem to bear the brunt of these diseases in terms of proportion of people impacted. Genetics, behaviors, and hormones…

…read more at http://rheumatoidarthritis.net/living/impact-ra-men/

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