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Posts Tagged ‘humira’

As noted in another post, I seem to have a refractory case of rheumatoid arthritis and have even been labeled as such by my rheumatologist. I’ve been on 16 different RA medications (see list bel0w) since being diagnosed in early 2009 (see https://rheumatoidarthritis.net/living/already-shot/). Some of these medications were taken in combination with one another. For example, methotrexate and Humira. All of these medications failed for a variety of reasons.

The latest drug on the heap of failed drugs is Kineret. I started injections starting Feb 7 after finally getting over a thrush infection which required two different anti-fungals to control. Within a day I started getting migraines and nausea. The migraines were present every day and increased in intensity to the point where I ended up taking migraine abortive medicines multiple times to knock them down. This happened after only having two significant migraine episodes the entire month of January. The nausea was primarily in the lower abdomen, got bad the second day, and increased to the point where it was waking me up in the middle of the night. I was not able to function well during the day. One evening I experienced sharp pains in the lower abdomen and also had some diarrhea periodically . Upon waking one morning, I just couldn’t stomach (pun intended) the thought of injecting Kineret and dealing with the migraines and nausea anymore. I contacted my rheumatologist and asked what to do. She stated, “I agree with stopping Kineret – thanks for trying. Let me chat with my partners to see what they think. There are several new drugs out for psoriatic arthritis that may have early data for RA too.

It’s hard to fathom untreated RA as the impact can be debilitating and disabling so treatment is needed. As my rheumatologist mentioned at the last appointment and in the recent message, it may be time to try something experimental and off label which would require insurance approval. Perhaps it’s time to investigate clinical trials as there are a host of drugs being tested for RA.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug  Duration  Reason for Stoping
Sulphasalazine oral

1 week

Allergic reaction – hives

Methotrexate oral and self-injection

2 years

Triggered migraines

Enbrel self-injection

5 months

Lack of efficacy

Meloxicam (Mobic) oral

3 weeks

Gastritis

Salsalate oral

3 weeks

Gastritis

Cimzia self-injection

5 months

Lack of efficacy

Humira self-injection

1.5 years

Reduced efficacy over time

Orencia infusion

1 year

Reduced efficacy over time

Imuran (azathioprine) oral

5 months

Gastric pain, nausea

Leflunomide (Arava) oral

5 months

Gastric pain, nausea, diarrhea

Actemra (tocilizumab) infusion

5 months

Raised cholesterol and triglycerides

Remicade (Infliximab) infusion

6 months

Triggered migraines

CellCept oral

6 months

Gastric pain, nausea

Rituxan (Rituxamab) infusion

2.5 years

Reduced efficacy over time, recurrent and serious infections

Xeljanz oral

3 months

Triggered migraines, gastric pain

Kineret (Anakinra) self- injection

1 week

Triggered migraines, nausea, diarrhea

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I’ve been on seven – count them – seven different biologic medicines since being diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. I started with several anti-TNF biologics and then moved to several others even bouncing back to try another anti-TNF before eventually trying Rituxan. I’ve self-injected with auto-inject pens, self-injected with needles, and seems like I’ve had every type of infusion possible. This is probably something of a record although similar stories emerge on discussion boards from time to time. With some of the biologics, I would respond for a period of time and then it would stop working. With others, there was never a response. With yet others, there would be some adverse side-effect causing cessation. This is not all to unusual as it is widely know in the rheumatology community that upwards of 30% of RA patients do not positively respond to anti-TNF biologic medicines.

Read the rest at … http://rheumatoidarthritis.net/living/switching-ra-medicines-dont-wait-long-try-many/

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I had a follow-up appointment with my rheumatologist to see how the Rituxan/Methotrexate combination is working. Since the time I started Rituxan, an MRI of my right elbow revealed a 50% tear in a tendon and active inflammation in the joint space. A cortisone shot from the orthopedic surgeon seems to have calmed things down for the time being. My right ankle displays regular sharp pain feeling much like it did a couple of years ago when I had surgery to remove bone erosion and repair soft tissue damage. Under examination from the rheumatologist, my toes were tender and painful – something I never noticed since I don’t regularly inspect my toes. I still experience considerable overall stiffness, joint pain, and fatigue. But the good news was that my rheumatologist noticed that I had less tenderness and swelling in my finger joints (it amazes me how she distinctly remembers such things). I agreed as I had noticed the same thing. My wife, one of the best and objective observers, also noticed some improvement over the past few weeks.

When I started other biological treatments, it was pretty clear whether or not it was working within the first few weeks. But that is not the case with Rixutan. Unlike anti-TNF drugs like Enbrel and Humira that can work more quickly, the full effect of Rituximab may not be seen for 16-24 weeks (National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society). My first Rituxan infusion was on September 23rd and I’m sitting at about 11 weeks since I started. According to the Rituxan frequently asked questions (FAQ) website,

At the time of their first checkup—8 weeks after starting treatment—many of those people had seen an improvement in their symptoms. And 6 months later, many were still experiencing improvement.”

The hope remains that this combination will continue to cause an improvement in symptoms. My rheumatologist believes that with the RA out of control for so long, it may take some time for a treatment to catch up and put out the inflammatory fire.

Rituxima Binding to CD20 on a B Cell Surface

Rituxima Binding to CD20 on a B Cell Surface (Photo credit: NIAID)

In this fast-paced, electronic society, we demand everything instantly. It’s difficult to wait for a treatment to take effect. But with the complex biological processes involved with rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system, and Rituxan, we must be patient. While scientists aren’t completely sure about the exact details, it is believed that Rituxan works by depleting the production of B cell lymphocytes by targeting an antigen called CD20 (see graphic) (Pescovitz, 2006). Since B cell production takes time and Rituxan only works on a portion of the production line (see graphic below from the Rituxan website), it stands to reason that it will take time for the therapeutic action to take hold. Slow and steady, hold the course, wait and see…these are all operative words at this time.

moa-illustration

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ACR 1I recently had the privilege to attend the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology. Considerable time was spent in the exhibit hall since, in addition to presenting a research paper, I was also volunteering at the booth of the Rheumatoid Patient Foundation.

The exhibit hall was overwhelming and the cavernous room was dominated by pharmaceutical companies. There were dozens of exhibits from large to small companies including, but not limited to, the following who provide many of the major biological treatments for RA:

ACR 2These pharmaceutical companies commanded the majority of the space and had professionally designed exhibits replete with multimedia presentations, large colorful signs and displays hanging from the ceiling, leather lounge chairs, espresso bars, snacks, colorful print materials, conference rooms, and an army of 20-30 sales representatives each. The rumor floating around was that these traveling exhibits cost upwards of $100,000 each in addition to the staff and other associated costs. They replace them every year. It is evident that the big pharmaceutical companies, especially those with expensive biological drugs on the market for RA, have vast amounts of funds to spend on sales and these exhibits. Based on this level of spending, it is obvious that this is big business and it is important for these companies to interact with the doctors and other health care providers who attend this conference in an effort to increase the sales of their drugs.

I enjoyed free espressos from Genentech/Roche each day – the manufacturer of my current RA medication Rituxan. One day while drinking my coffee and looking over research materials on Rituxan, a sales representative approached me obviously expecting me to be a doctor. I told her that I was a patient advocate who was actually taking Rituxan. She literally took a step backwards and told me that she was sorry and hoped I felt better. I laughed and said thanks and grabbed some print materials on clinical trail results and side effects. This awkward moment drove home the potential disconnect between the company sales force and patients. In spite of this brief and awkward interaction, the pharmaceutical companies must be commended for several things.

ACR 3Most of the research and development (R&D) behind these biological treatments for RA were paid for by the pharmaceutical companies. Oftentimes, the basic research, paid for by government or private foundation money, starts with a university-based researcher. These basic ideas lead to potential new treatments and the drug companies take over the onerous and lengthy task of developing and trying out new drugs. For biological drugs, this process may take years. And for every drug that makes it to market, there may be dozens that fail. Such development processes are extremely expensive and those costs are passed onto the patient in the cost of the drug. During the conference I was able to speak with several companies about RA treatments that are in Phase III Clinical trails (the last phase before seeking government approval). The concern is about who is going to pay for the R&D once pharmaceutical companies go over the so-called patent cliff in the next few years when their patents run out and they start to loose market share and profits.

Another patient benefit provided by the pharmaceutical companies for expensive biological treatments for RA are co-pay assistance plans. All of the companies listed above have such plans and they pay out millions of dollars each year helping patients be able afford treatments that can cost between $16,000 – $40,000 a year. This assistance, while extremely beneficial to those who need it, also demonstrates the large profit margins built into the “retail” costs of the drugs.

During the conference, I also met several consultants who are contracted by pharmaceutical companies to conduct research related to patient reactions and opinions about their products. While one may cynically infer that the companies are simply trying to increase their market share by pressuring the patients to ask for their drug, it was clear from the consultants that they genuinely want to increase the positive interactions between patients and the pharmaceutical companies in an effort to improve patient care and future drug development.

Yes, pharmaceutical companies are huge for-profit entities with a major goal of making money for shareholders. And the companies with major biological treatments for RA make enormous profits (Humira sales alone for the 4th quarter of 2012 were $2.7 billion). But they also bear the brunt of the R&D process, help with co-pays, and appear to seek patient interaction. As the patent cliff approaches, time will tell how it will impact these companies and the future of RA drug development.

ACR 4

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For those who live with type I diabetes, injecting insulin multiple times a day becomes a regular routine. But rheumatoid arthritis patients are also likely to face using needles to administer a variety of medications.

After receiving a diagnosis, there is a progression of RA treatments recommended by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR)[i] that usually begin with chemical-based disease modifying drugs (DMARDs) like methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide (Arava), and hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil). All of these drugs are available in pill form. Even though available in pill form, many people cannot tolerate the side effects of the most commonly used DMARD, methotrexate, as it is prone to cause nausea. Methotrexate is also available in an injectable liquid form and many rheumatologists will prescribe this form when side effects can’t be tolerated. If this is the case, the patient must learn to self-inject…

…Read more at http://rheumatoidarthritis.net/living/prepare-poked-needles-ra-treatments-go-hand-hand/

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My rheumatologist reiterated with me yesterday that I have a tough to treat case of RA – called refractory RA. She displayed disappointment that all of the treatment plans we’ve tried over the years have not had the intended impact. We’ve cycled through four TNF inhibitors (Enbrel, Cimzia, Humira, and Remicade), Orencia, and Actemra. And that’s in addition to various DMARDs including sulphasalzine, azathioprine, and leflunomide (Arava). The reasons for stopping the use of these drugs runs the gamut of lack of efficacy to intolerable side effects. My doctor was apologetic, felt bad I wasn’t helped by all of the treatment plans, and genuinely expressed concern for the impact RA has had on my life recently. But I reassured her that I trusted her medical judgement and that the impact comes over time allowing time to adjust. I appreciated her empathy and deep desire to help.

We discussed the few remaining options which includes Xeljanz, Kineret, and Rituxan. Xeljanz (tofacitinib) was approved in the United States but not approved in Europe. We both felt that more data was needed on this “oral biologic” before giving it a try. Kineret, or anakinra is a biological response modifier that targets interleukin 1. My rheumy said that is not used that much anymore because of more effective options. A recently published report indicates that a Swedish company just purchased the rights for Kineret from biological pharmaceutical giant Amgen. Such a move seems like Amgen is dumping the drug likely because it is not profitable and is moving onto other new drugs. After much discussion, we both agreed to try Rituxan and I will continue to inject 20mg of methotrexate weekly. 

As I was describing my new treatment regimen to friends and family, I found myself trying to explain the drugs, how they are administered, how they act to treat RA, and the possible side effects. As I read more about these drugs, it struck me as interesting that both medicines were originally developed to treat certain forms of cancer. Methotrexate is a chemotherapy drug developed in the 1950s and is still used to treat forms of leukemia, breast cancer, lung cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and head and neck cancers (see American Cancer Society). It stops the growth of cancer cells by affecting their metabolism. Given the immunosuppressing nature of methotrexate, it is now commonly used in lower doses to treat various autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis. It’s also used to treat tubal ectopic pregnancies by inducing abortion. In spite of the low doses used in treating RA, some of the chemotherapy side effects remain including hair loss and nausea. This paints a picture of a rather toxic medicine! But I’ve been injecting 20mg weekly for some time now and seem to tolerate it rather well.

Rituxan is also known by the names MabThera and Rituxamab. This monoclonal antibody is a biological medicine that was originally developed in the late 1990s to target the protein CD20 present in certain phases of B lymphocytes. It was originally approved for the treatment of B cell related lymphomas and leukemias (see the Rituxan website). In the early 2000s, it was shown in clinical trials to be effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis and gained FDA approval for use in refractory RA cases in 2006. The involvement of B cells in autoimmune diseases likely led to the investigation of Rituxan as a treatment for RA. The side effect profile appears similar to other biologicals but with some additional infusion side effects requiring some pre-medications along with a few more rare serious infections.

The use of cancer drugs to treat RA points to the connection of both diseases to the immune system. It also demonstrates the serious nature of RA. Given the fact that both methotrexate and Rituxan were originally designed to treat certain cancers, and that they are now secondarily being used to treat RA, may point to the fact that a much larger proportion of research funding goes to cancer (see this earlier post). While I don’t mind receiving the “leftovers” or being an “afterthought” if the medicines effectively treat RA, the ideal would be for the development of new treatments or even cures specifically designed for the processes involved in autoimmune diseases. In the meantime, I’ll go to the infusion clinic and begin Rituxan infusions along with cancer patients and see if it can take care of this refractory case of RA!

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Ever since the H1N1 swine flu scare a few years ago, I make it a point to get a flu vaccine every autumn. When receiving a regular physical exam from my general practitioner last week, the doctor suggested that a pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine be added…

To check out the rest of this post, go to the newly launched website rheumatoidarthritis.net. I will be writing posts for this site periodically as a Patient Advocate and will continue to make regular posts at this personal blog.

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