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Posts Tagged ‘methotrexate’

As noted in another post, I seem to have a refractory case of rheumatoid arthritis and have even been labeled as such by my rheumatologist. I’ve been on 16 different RA medications (see list bel0w) since being diagnosed in early 2009 (see https://rheumatoidarthritis.net/living/already-shot/). Some of these medications were taken in combination with one another. For example, methotrexate and Humira. All of these medications failed for a variety of reasons.

The latest drug on the heap of failed drugs is Kineret. I started injections starting Feb 7 after finally getting over a thrush infection which required two different anti-fungals to control. Within a day I started getting migraines and nausea. The migraines were present every day and increased in intensity to the point where I ended up taking migraine abortive medicines multiple times to knock them down. This happened after only having two significant migraine episodes the entire month of January. The nausea was primarily in the lower abdomen, got bad the second day, and increased to the point where it was waking me up in the middle of the night. I was not able to function well during the day. One evening I experienced sharp pains in the lower abdomen and also had some diarrhea periodically . Upon waking one morning, I just couldn’t stomach (pun intended) the thought of injecting Kineret and dealing with the migraines and nausea anymore. I contacted my rheumatologist and asked what to do. She stated, “I agree with stopping Kineret – thanks for trying. Let me chat with my partners to see what they think. There are several new drugs out for psoriatic arthritis that may have early data for RA too.

It’s hard to fathom untreated RA as the impact can be debilitating and disabling so treatment is needed. As my rheumatologist mentioned at the last appointment and in the recent message, it may be time to try something experimental and off label which would require insurance approval. Perhaps it’s time to investigate clinical trials as there are a host of drugs being tested for RA.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug  Duration  Reason for Stoping
Sulphasalazine oral

1 week

Allergic reaction – hives

Methotrexate oral and self-injection

2 years

Triggered migraines

Enbrel self-injection

5 months

Lack of efficacy

Meloxicam (Mobic) oral

3 weeks

Gastritis

Salsalate oral

3 weeks

Gastritis

Cimzia self-injection

5 months

Lack of efficacy

Humira self-injection

1.5 years

Reduced efficacy over time

Orencia infusion

1 year

Reduced efficacy over time

Imuran (azathioprine) oral

5 months

Gastric pain, nausea

Leflunomide (Arava) oral

5 months

Gastric pain, nausea, diarrhea

Actemra (tocilizumab) infusion

5 months

Raised cholesterol and triglycerides

Remicade (Infliximab) infusion

6 months

Triggered migraines

CellCept oral

6 months

Gastric pain, nausea

Rituxan (Rituxamab) infusion

2.5 years

Reduced efficacy over time, recurrent and serious infections

Xeljanz oral

3 months

Triggered migraines, gastric pain

Kineret (Anakinra) self- injection

1 week

Triggered migraines, nausea, diarrhea

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I’ve been on seven – count them – seven different biologic medicines since being diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. I started with several anti-TNF biologics and then moved to several others even bouncing back to try another anti-TNF before eventually trying Rituxan. I’ve self-injected with auto-inject pens, self-injected with needles, and seems like I’ve had every type of infusion possible. This is probably something of a record although similar stories emerge on discussion boards from time to time. With some of the biologics, I would respond for a period of time and then it would stop working. With others, there was never a response. With yet others, there would be some adverse side-effect causing cessation. This is not all to unusual as it is widely know in the rheumatology community that upwards of 30% of RA patients do not positively respond to anti-TNF biologic medicines.

Read the rest at … http://rheumatoidarthritis.net/living/switching-ra-medicines-dont-wait-long-try-many/

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I’m the only male Patient Advocate and Moderator on www.rheumatoidarthritis.net and the corresponding Facebook page. There is a great page on RA and Women’s Health on our website but no corresponding page for men. Of all the people who visit the Facebook page, only 15% of the people reached were men and only 9% of the people who actively engaged by liking, sharing, or commenting on posts were men. All of this is not too surprising given the fact that the ratio of women to men with RA is about 2 to 1.[1] But with approximately 1.5 million people in the United States with RA[2], that would mean that almost half a million men suffer from RA.

When it comes to autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, lupus, scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjogren’s syndrome, women seem to bear the brunt of these diseases in terms of proportion of people impacted. Genetics, behaviors, and hormones…

…read more at http://rheumatoidarthritis.net/living/impact-ra-men/

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When first diagnosed with RA over five years ago, I was prescribed oral methotrexate (MTX). After a month of taking the pills, I felt terrible and was basically non-functional. It felt like a truck ran over me as I had no energy, felt sick at my stomach non-stop, and had headaches. The RA symptoms were bad enough but this just added insult to injury. My rheumatologist finally told me that I clearly could not tolerate the drug and to stop taking it. The side effects subsided within a few weeks.

Several years later, and with a different rheumatologist, I asked about taking MTX injections because I was desperately trying to find a treatment combination that worked. It was recommended to add MTX with the biological medicines I was taking as the combination of the two typically produces better results. I started take methotrexate via weekly self-injection and found that the nausea side effects were much less than with oral pills. I seemed to tolerate the MTX much better when injecting it and adding both folic acid and leucovorin. I rarely felt nausea and did not loose any hair.

But an increase in migraine headaches over the past year coincided with the time I started taking MTX. While not one of the more commonly reported side effects like nausea or hair loss, headaches can come from taking MTX.[i] [ii] As my neurologist stated, the causes of the migraines are likely based on multiple factors including genetics, my fight with RA, and the medicines I take. During the past few months when the headaches increased in number, I completely stopped taking methotrexate in an effort to eliminate any possible triggers. We’ve been able to reduce the number of migraines through the use of gabapentin, a drug used for neuropathic pain, and botox injections (no, I don’t look any younger!). My rheumatologist suggested that I start retaking methotrexate by beginning with low doses initially and then increase back up to the dose I was taking before. I waited until I had been headache free for two weeks and then injected MTX. Within 48 hours I began to get migraines and fought off four bad headaches over the next five days. While it’s hard to determine direct cause and effect, this was enough for me to wonder if MTX was indeed a migraine trigger. I did not inject MTX the next week and did not have any bad migraines. I contacted my rheumy and she suggested I just stop MTX altogether. The good news is that during this time, Rituxan infusions that I started last September were starting to work at controlling my RA and this was during the time I had stopped taking MTX.

So for the time being, I’ll just stick with Rituxan as my main RA treatment. And I’ll be sitting in the infusion center this Wednesday starting my second series of doses.

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In the five some years since being diagnosed with RA, I’ve tried a boatload of treatment options including various NSAIDS (chewed up my stomach), multiple DMARDs (one caused an allergic reaction and am currently injecting methotrexate), and I’m currently on my 7th biological medication – Rituxan infusions.

My rheumatologist always says that the treatment goal is that I hardly pay attention to my joints throughout the day. This sounds like everyday language for the ultimate target for RA treatment which is called clinical remission. This is defined as one or less than on tender joint, one or less than one swollen joint, low inflammation blood tests, and a strong patient self-assessment. Over the five years of treatment, I’ve never gotten anywhere close to these goals. But over the past couple of weeks it’s become clear that Rituxan is working like no other treatment combination has! Pain, swelling, and tenderness are hardly noticeable. My hip doesn’t hurt when sleeping or walking. My knee can pull me up steps. I can get out of bed relatively quickly without much stiffness. My right ankle that’s had 2 surgeries lets me know it’s there but it doesn’t scream at me all day along. The bottom line is that RA is starting to take a back seat in daily life…just like my rheumatologist hoped for! This is the first time in five year to have this experience and for this I am very grateful. It was a long time coming and many starts and stops and trying dozens of drug combinations. Of course, I’ll temper the joy just a little and take each pain free day at a time as you never know what lurks around the bend.

It took a while for me to figure out what was going on with Rituxan. These complex biological processes take time – in fact it’s been 4 months since my first infusion and I was already giving up hope for Rituxan to work. But I was also quite distracted over the past month fighting a battle with chronic and almost daily migraines. We’re not sure what’s causing them although my neurologist believes that genetics, a fight with an autoimmune disease, and the medications used to treat RA may all be contributing. So while RA is finally getting under control after 5 years, we’re busy trying to find the best treatment for the migraines. In addition to the emergency triptans (like Imitrex) to take when a migraine comes on, I’ve been on three different long term preventative medications, and have been into the infusion clinic two times for a cocktail of meds in an effort to break a long migraine cycle – the latest was a 4 day killer over the weekend. I have an MRI/MRA  (image of brain and blood vessels) scheduled next week to rule out any functional issues and we’re seeking insurance approval for botox injections which my doctor said works very well for his patients.

Two steps forward for RA treatment success after five long years and dozens of drugs! For this I will truly thank God as I was getting close to giving up hope as the options were getting few and far between. One step back with the nasty migraines. Such seems to be the life of a patient with a chronic disease. But just like what happened with RA, I believe that the migraines will eventually get under control. Two steps forward and one step back still equals forward progress.

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For those who live with type I diabetes, injecting insulin multiple times a day becomes a regular routine. But rheumatoid arthritis patients are also likely to face using needles to administer a variety of medications.

After receiving a diagnosis, there is a progression of RA treatments recommended by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR)[i] that usually begin with chemical-based disease modifying drugs (DMARDs) like methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide (Arava), and hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil). All of these drugs are available in pill form. Even though available in pill form, many people cannot tolerate the side effects of the most commonly used DMARD, methotrexate, as it is prone to cause nausea. Methotrexate is also available in an injectable liquid form and many rheumatologists will prescribe this form when side effects can’t be tolerated. If this is the case, the patient must learn to self-inject…

…Read more at http://rheumatoidarthritis.net/living/prepare-poked-needles-ra-treatments-go-hand-hand/

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My rheumatologist reiterated with me yesterday that I have a tough to treat case of RA – called refractory RA. She displayed disappointment that all of the treatment plans we’ve tried over the years have not had the intended impact. We’ve cycled through four TNF inhibitors (Enbrel, Cimzia, Humira, and Remicade), Orencia, and Actemra. And that’s in addition to various DMARDs including sulphasalzine, azathioprine, and leflunomide (Arava). The reasons for stopping the use of these drugs runs the gamut of lack of efficacy to intolerable side effects. My doctor was apologetic, felt bad I wasn’t helped by all of the treatment plans, and genuinely expressed concern for the impact RA has had on my life recently. But I reassured her that I trusted her medical judgement and that the impact comes over time allowing time to adjust. I appreciated her empathy and deep desire to help.

We discussed the few remaining options which includes Xeljanz, Kineret, and Rituxan. Xeljanz (tofacitinib) was approved in the United States but not approved in Europe. We both felt that more data was needed on this “oral biologic” before giving it a try. Kineret, or anakinra is a biological response modifier that targets interleukin 1. My rheumy said that is not used that much anymore because of more effective options. A recently published report indicates that a Swedish company just purchased the rights for Kineret from biological pharmaceutical giant Amgen. Such a move seems like Amgen is dumping the drug likely because it is not profitable and is moving onto other new drugs. After much discussion, we both agreed to try Rituxan and I will continue to inject 20mg of methotrexate weekly. 

As I was describing my new treatment regimen to friends and family, I found myself trying to explain the drugs, how they are administered, how they act to treat RA, and the possible side effects. As I read more about these drugs, it struck me as interesting that both medicines were originally developed to treat certain forms of cancer. Methotrexate is a chemotherapy drug developed in the 1950s and is still used to treat forms of leukemia, breast cancer, lung cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and head and neck cancers (see American Cancer Society). It stops the growth of cancer cells by affecting their metabolism. Given the immunosuppressing nature of methotrexate, it is now commonly used in lower doses to treat various autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis. It’s also used to treat tubal ectopic pregnancies by inducing abortion. In spite of the low doses used in treating RA, some of the chemotherapy side effects remain including hair loss and nausea. This paints a picture of a rather toxic medicine! But I’ve been injecting 20mg weekly for some time now and seem to tolerate it rather well.

Rituxan is also known by the names MabThera and Rituxamab. This monoclonal antibody is a biological medicine that was originally developed in the late 1990s to target the protein CD20 present in certain phases of B lymphocytes. It was originally approved for the treatment of B cell related lymphomas and leukemias (see the Rituxan website). In the early 2000s, it was shown in clinical trials to be effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis and gained FDA approval for use in refractory RA cases in 2006. The involvement of B cells in autoimmune diseases likely led to the investigation of Rituxan as a treatment for RA. The side effect profile appears similar to other biologicals but with some additional infusion side effects requiring some pre-medications along with a few more rare serious infections.

The use of cancer drugs to treat RA points to the connection of both diseases to the immune system. It also demonstrates the serious nature of RA. Given the fact that both methotrexate and Rituxan were originally designed to treat certain cancers, and that they are now secondarily being used to treat RA, may point to the fact that a much larger proportion of research funding goes to cancer (see this earlier post). While I don’t mind receiving the “leftovers” or being an “afterthought” if the medicines effectively treat RA, the ideal would be for the development of new treatments or even cures specifically designed for the processes involved in autoimmune diseases. In the meantime, I’ll go to the infusion clinic and begin Rituxan infusions along with cancer patients and see if it can take care of this refractory case of RA!

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