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Posts Tagged ‘steroid injection’

It’s been six weeks since right shoulder surgery was performed in order to resect the acronomim and clavicle joint (AC joint) and remove rotator cuff tissue that was damaged by bone spurs. At a follow-up with the surgeon today, he indicated that patients tend to talk about still having pain but of a different quality. This is true for me in that the joint pain is much diminished but dull aches remain. He said this is primarily from healing bone and surrounding soft tissues. He cleared me for stepping physical therapy up from gentle stretches to strengthening exercises. Given my battle with RA, he said that recovery is likely to be longer than normal.

We then turned attention to my left shoulder as it’s been bothersome for quite some time as well. The surgeon gave a steroid injection into it about 8 weeks ago but there was only about a week of relief. He got an x-ray during the visit and discovered that there was acronomim bone rubbing on clavicle bone with no joint space visible. He attributed this to inflammatory arthritis (RA) and said that the cartilage between the bones was damaged but there were no large bone spurs visible. Like with the right shoulder, surgery would be needed to repair this joint and he suggested waiting at least three months after the other surgery. This would be good timing as my insurance out of pocket costs are met and will be until the end of June. We will schedule surgery at another follow-up appointment in six weeks.

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A visit to my rheumatologist on Friday turned from a routine 15 minute visit into a 45 minute triage session. At the end, the rheumy mentioned that sometimes things can seem to swirl out of control and it certainly feels that way right now.

We discussed neck/shoulder/arm pain and muscle atrophy which increased over the past few months. My neurologist ran a large battery of tests including MRIs of the chest and brain, nerve conduction and EMG tests, and numerous blood tests. The only issue found of note was muscle dysfunction on the EMG. A myelogram/CT scan two month ago showed some nerve compression in the neck but the surgeon said it did not warrant intervention. My rheumy argued that a second opinion was now in order and said that they would contact two neurosurgeons for ideas about what to do.

I received a steroid injection into my right shoulder. Both shoulders have been crunchy and painful for over two years but have kicked up a notch lately to the point of being quite distracting during both the day and night. My rheumy is requesting that a radiologist reread a recent MRI of my chest to examine potential joint damage to shoulder joints. The MRI was originally ordered to look for potential inflammation in the brachial plexus nerves but caught images of each shoulder joint.

Blood tests were ordered and included routine complete blood count (CBC), metabolic panel, and inflammation measures. But immunoglobulin (Ig) tests were also ordered for the first time. Immunoglobulins are immune antibodies which may be indicative of fighting infections. These were seen by the rheumy as important given my long term battle with meningitis and now C diff bacteria. I just finished a second antibiotic for C diff, a particularly problematic gut bacteria that causes severe diarrhea and toxin-induced ulcers in the colon. I started on the antibiotic vancomycin for 14 days but it did not control the infection as another positive C diff test came back. My infectious disease doctor said that the bacteria was not likely antibiotic resistant but that my compromised immune system from RA and Rituxan was making it difficult for me to fight the infection. I was scheduled to receive the next Rituxan infusion in a couple of weeks but my rheumy suggested putting it off until the infection gets under control. The infectious disease doc put me on a new antibiotic called Dificid or fidaxomicin. It was recently approved for treating C diff infections. It cost $1,400 for 20 pills! I just finished that 10 day course but the symptoms persist. My rheumy asked me to contact the infectious disease doctor Monday and I also started the process of setting up an appointment to see my gastroenterologist who will want to do a colonoscopy to check on the physical status of the colon. In the meantime, the rheumy set me up with an immunologist to check my immune system particularly IgG antibodies which is involved in fighting infections. The rheumy told me that IgG infusions may be a possibility to help boost the immune system and help me fight the C diff infection.

All told including office visits, ER visits and hospitalization, the following specialists will have been seen over the past two months: emergency room, internist/hospitalist, radiologist, neurosurgeon, neurologist, immunologist, infectious disease, rheumatologist, and gastroenterologist. Trying to keep up with all of these issues and specialists is almost a full time job. I appreciate that my rheumatologist serves as the central care giver who really knows all of my conditions and treatments. Hopefully some relief will be forthcoming soon.

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I’m still in the midst of recovering from cervical fusion surgery on May 15 and am currently completing physical therapy. The process seems to be going well, pain and numbness is almost completely gone, and I’m slowly regaining muscle strength. After dealing with it for over 8 months, the neck and associated parts finally feels much better. But RA is never silent and has a way of rearing its ugly head just when you think things are calm. Sure, there is always the ongoing “background noise” of RA – fatigue, joint and muscle pain, finger swelling and pain, joint locking, and the persistent ankle pain after having three surgeries. But now the left hip is begging – no screaming – for attention.

Hip problems became apparent almost two years ago when I began getting steroid injections for trochanteric bursitis from my rheumatologist. Bursae are sac-like structures that are found in some joints and aid in providing friction reduction.[1] I had a bursa removed as part of an ankle surgery. The trochanteric bursa is on the outside of the hip and is commonly involved in RA.[2]

While my neck was healing, the left hip progressively grew worse. Sitting for any length of time was impossible, getting in and out of a chair and car was difficult, sleeping on the left side was not feasible, and the left side was favored while walking. At a recent rheumatology appointment, a fourth cortisone steroid injection was given into the trochanteric bursa. But the injection brought no relief. My rheumatologist referred me to an orthopedic specialist.

The orthopedic surgeon examined x-rays and noted that the space in the ball and socket joint, while somewhat reduced, looked fine. There was no bone erosion perceived. We spent some time discussing my earlier problems with the trochanteric bursa, the multiple steroid injections, and my current symptoms of groin and buttock pain. He then laid me down on my back and began to examine my hip movement through a series of tests. I couldn’t lift my leg off the table and extreme pain was felt when he manipulated it in various ways. After the physical exam his entire line of inquiry changed from the more external trochanteric bursa to focusing on tissues around the joint itself. He immediately began to suspect a labral tear. The labrum is cartilage that surrounds the hip joint.[3] But a physical exam and x-ray cannot directly pinpoint what’s really going on so an MRI is needed. A traditional MRI can’t always detect soft tissue in the complex hip joint so an arthrogram is added. Before the MRI, a radiologist injects a combination of fluid, steroid, and a contrast into the hip joint under the guidance of an x-ray. After the injection, you go directly to the MRI machine. The steroid can also provide a therapeutic purpose in reducing inflammation and pain. I am scheduled for an MR arthrogram tomorrow and hopefully it will help solve the mystery.

In addition to the more traditional bone erosion, I have a history of developing soft tissue damage to the musculoskeletal system from RA. This episode with the hip seems to be following that story.

[1] http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=a00409

[2] https://www.rheumatology.org/Practice/Clinical/Patients/Diseases_And_Conditions/Tendinitis_and_Bursitis/

[3] http://www.hss.edu/condition-list_labral-tears-hip.asp#.U_zH9WRDvA4

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In an earlier post, I outlined how RA can impact much more than bones including many organs and soft tissues. One group of soft tissues that can be damaged by RA includes those involved with the musculoskeletal system. The musculoskeletal system involves a complex interaction between muscles, bones, joints, and various connective soft tissues – all which can be the target of RA.

Erosion of bone tissues in joints is on of the trademark symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Through complex autoimmune biochemical processes, the body’s immune system attacks it’s own tissues like it was a foreign invader. A cascade of signaling chemicals promotes the production of bone cells called osteoclasts that erode bone tissue and surrounding cartilage. This kind of gross damage…

Read more at http://rheumatoidarthritis.net/living/attack-on-connective-tissues/

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There exists a definite gap in the RA literature about constitutes a “flare.” Although everyone talks about them, you won’t find a clinical definition or set of criteria. During a visit to my rheumatologist today, in addition to routine questions about medications, the nurse asked if I was experiencing any flares. I had to be honest that the past few weeks have not been pleasant as an increase in joint pain, joint swelling, and fatigue reared its ugly head. My rheumy has a great way of discussing symptoms, examining joints, and asking questions to paint the big picture. Always in the back of my mind is whether or not the current treatment regime is working. After the conversation and exam, it became clear that a hefty load at work (60-70 hours a week, 6 days a week), combined with recovery from sinus surgery in September, were contributing to how RA was behaving. My rheumy called it, “on the edge of smoldering”. She wants to tweak with my meds by upping the dose of Arava to 15mg daily in an effort to knock the symptoms down a little while avoiding the nausea I experienced at 20mg. Getting some rest is also prescribed now that a very busy deadline season at work is done.

As part of the recent smoldering, trochanteric busitis in the left hip has gotten worse. Since the nurse made a note of this, my rheumy walked into the room holding a syringe…I knew what was coming. An injection of depo-medrol, a corticosteroid, combined with lidocaine was prepared as I lay half naked on the exam table. I jokingly asked if the depo-medrol came from the same manufacturer that caused the recent spate of meningitis deaths. She laughed and said everyone had been asking the same question lately and that it was from a different source. There was hardly any sensation when she said it was all done. Now I wait to see if the injection will put out the smoldering fire in my hip. She said that if it doesn’t get better within two weeks, to call and come back in for a second injection. In the meantime, I’m taking the rest of the day off and doing nothing but having lunch with my wife and watching the World Series.

I’ve been reading up on the immune system and the role of B cells since I recently read about a new possible line of RA research and treatments related to B cells. My next post will focus on this topic.

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Creative Commons photo credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Depo-Medrol_(Methylprednisolone_Acetate_injectable_suspension,_USP).jpg

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